“Amanda,” a smart, stylish debut by the Italian writer-director Carolina Cavalli, plays like “Lady Bird” by way of Wes Anderson’s deadpan existentialism. Its heroine, the prickly Amanda (Benedetta Porcaroli), a college grad and the daughter of wealthy pharmacy owners, would rather twiddle her thumbs than work. Terrified of socializing with people her own age, she claims to prefer hanging out in the family chateau with her prepubescent niece and the maid. She would secretly kill for meaningful companionship — but first, she has to learn not to bite.

Equipped with an arsenal of verbal snapbacks, Amanda stomps around her northern Italian hometown, a smattering of Brutalist buildings and empty parking lots, with a hustler’s steely resolve — only her “hustle” consists of racking up enough department store loyalty points to win a prize, a shoddy standing fan that she could otherwise easily purchase.

When Amanda’s mother (Monica Nappo) suggests she seek out Rebecca…